10 things birth mothers think about

There are 10 things birth mothers think about, wish for, and hopes for when placing their child for adoption. If you are in an open adoption, you may have heard some already, if not, they are important to know. They are:

I did not place my child because they were unwanted. I wanted them so much that I continued a pregnancy filled with unanswered questions.

I chose adoption because I loved my child. This parental love allowed me to put their needs before my own when making my choice.

This choice affected more than just me. They has a grandmother, a grandfather, and aunts and uncles who love them as well, and they will be missed.

I wish for the day I can look into my child’s eyes and tell them I love them one more time.

I hope that you will teach my child about their beginnings, about where they was born and who I am.

I hope you will teach respect to my child by showing respect for me in your discussions.

I wish I could be there to answer my child’s questions about adoption, but I trust you to answer them truthfully as best you can.

I will never stop thinking about my child. They will always be a part of who I am.

I would never try to disrupt my child’s new family with you. I put too much emotion and suffering into making this choice to allow anything to disrupt it, including me.

In my eyes, you will always be my child’s parents. And that thought brings me happiness.

 

Adoption is About Creating a Plan Not “Giving Up”

If you are just beginning to look into adoption as a birth parent, adoptive parent or adoptee you may hear or read the term “give up”. While this is a common term used by modern society and the media it is actually not the preferred term. It does not positively and realistically speak about the adoption process. It tends to present an outdated version of the process.

 

Birth mothers are not “giving up” their babies. They are doing quite the opposite. They are creating very detailed plans for their children and making sure they are given the very best. It is a very tough decision made from their love and strength for their child. Using the words “give up” makes it seem like it’s a quick decision where a woman gives up her child without any thought or plan.

 

Thankfully women are no longer told that they must hand over or give up there babies without ever hearing from them again, never getting to know how they are doing or telling them how much they are loved.

 

Adoption truly has changed through the decades. Women are now able to create their adoptions to fit their needs. They get to plan how they want things to go. In many adoptions today women create their adoption plans and get to have on going contact with their children through pictures, updates and sometimes visits.

 

Adoption Minnesota and other adoption professionals advocate and prefer to use terms such as “place your baby for adoption,” or “create an adoption plan,” rather than “give up your baby.” We feel that it better reflects the work that goes into finding the right adoptive family and the birth mother’s strength, courage and love for her child.

 

If you want to talk about adoption, the process of have any questions please feel free to call us at 612-333-0593 or email us at info@adoptionmn.com.

Commonly Asked Questions by Women Thinking About Placing for Adoption

Commonly asked Questions by Women Thinking About Placing for Adoption

At Adoption Minnesota, we do independent adoptions. Adoptive parents and birth parents plan their own adoption. There are no rules or policies that must be followed, so every adoption is unique. It is up to the birth and adoptive parents to decide how they want their adoptions to go. Birth parents are also guaranteed that only the family they choose can adopt the child.

1. Do I get to choose a family to adopt my baby?

Yes. You are able to choose the family you would like to place your child with. You can either choose one of the many families that Adoption Minnesota is working with, or if you know of someone who you would like to place with we can help you work with them too.

2. Can I get to know the adoptive family?

Absolutely. Many birth parents find it important to get to know the family before they chose them, and even more afterwards. We want you to feel comfortable with the family before you move forward with them. Many adoptive parents are open to having contact through phone, email and in-person visits.

3. What process do adoptive parents have to go through?

All Adoptive parents must go through an extensive process called a home study, before being approved to adopt a child. They must provide the agency with recent medical exams, financial information and complete a criminal background check among many other things.

4. Does my baby have to go into foster care after it is born?

No. Typically the baby goes home directly from the hospital with the adoptive parents. However, if the birth parent is uncomfortable with that, or is having a hard time deciding what to do, someone else can do short term care for the baby until the birth parent makes a decision on how they want to move forward.

5. Can I have a relationship with my child after placement?

In most cases birth parents and adoptive families can have openness and a relationship after placement. Birth parents and adoptive parents can make an agreement about exchanging future information. This can include having updates and pictures sent to them or even visits. It also includes arrangements for exchanging any future medical information, which might be important for the adopted child or birth parent.

6. Does the birth father have to be involved?

No. While it is a good idea to involve the birth father if he is at all willing, it is not required in Minnesota unless he is married to the birth mother, living with the birth mother, or is on the baby’s birth certificate. If he does nothing to take legal action to have himself declared the father of the child, his rights are automatically terminated a certain number of days after the child’s birth.

7. How long do I have to change my mind after placing for adoption?

You can change your mind about placing your baby until your written consent becomes final. In Minnesota the earliest a birth parent can sign a consent is 72 hours after the baby is born, and you must sign within 60 days from birth. You have 10 working days from the date you sign the consent before it becomes irrevocable and final.

8. How much will adoption cost me?

Adoption Minnesota does not charge the birth parents anything for the services provided to them. We are here to help you through this process and create a plan for your child. In many cases the birth parents legal fees are also paid for.

9. Can I get help with my expenses?

In Minnesota an adoptive family can help the birth mother by paying certain expenses for her. Generally the courts will allow them to pay for such things as maternity clothing, living expenses, and transportation to and from medical appointments. They can also pay for the birth mother’s legal fees, medical bills and any counseling she wants to help her cope through the adoption.

10. Will I have support after the placement?

Not only will you be supported throughout your placement, your counselor can offer you ongoing adoption support as long as needed. There are also adoption support groups, retreats and other birth parents who have gone through this process who are willing to talk and meet with you if desired. We are here for you.

 

If you have any questions feel free to call us at 612-333-0593 or email us at info@adoptionmn.com

Reid and Paul’s Adoption Story

On a Sunday September 18th we received a screening call from Kathi, our Adoption MN social worker. She told us there was a birth mother interested in 5 families, and we were her second choice. We were told the birth mother, Lauren, was shy and working slowly through the process. She was due on November 4th, so time was quickly approaching for her to make a plan.

Many days went by and we didn’t hear anything. We wondered if Lauren had picked her first choice. We started to think that maybe this situation wasn’t going to be “the one” for us, which was OK. Our philosophy surrounding our adoption plan was “when it happens, it happens…” as we wait and hope for a placement.READ MORE

Jeff & Beth’s Adoption Story

It all began with a phone call from our Adoptive Parent Counselor and these words: “Hi, this is Robyn. I’ve got a situation that I’d like to talk to you about.” But wait… it didn’t all begin there… it began before that with an Orientation Meeting at Adoption Minnesota.

From the minute we walked into Adoption Minnesota, we knew that we were in the right place. We had visited other agencies, but none of them felt right, none of them felt like “us.” A friend of a friend told us about Adoption Minnesota. She had adopted her daughter through them and said so many positive things, we knew we had to check them out.READ MORE

Erica’s Story

I was about six months along when I decided adoption was the right plan. I knew that if I parented, I could not give my baby everything I wanted him to have. I also knew that if I placed him for adoption, I could give him the world. I recently talked to the adoptive parents, and they said all he does is giggle. At that point I felt like God had come down and given me a kiss because I had done something so wonderful.