Looking to Give Your Baby up for Adoption?

Looking to give your baby up for adoption?

Here are 6 steps you may take if you have an unplanned pregnancy and want to work with a private adoption agency:

  1. Deciding adoption is right for you and your baby:

Before even starting the process of “giving a baby up” for adoption, you must take time to learn about the process and if adoption is right for you and your baby/child. Adoption Minnesota is a licensed adoption agency, who explains this process and works with women to educate them on adoption in a non-judging or pressuring way. We believe that you can’t make a decision about giving up your baby until you have all the facts.

  1. Create a private adoption plan for your baby:

At Adoption Minnesota we help you with your unplanned pregnancy. You can create a plan of how you want your adoption to go. You are in control and get to make many of the decisions about how you want the process to go. You get to decide how to go about putting your baby up for adoption in a way that you are comfortable with.

You will be assigned a counselor who will explain your options and go over what you are looking for in a family. They will help you create a hospital plan for labor and delivery along with a plan for openness or ongoing contact after placement.

  1. Choosing an Adoptive Family for your baby:

At Adoption Minnesota we feel that finding an adoptive family that you feel comfortable with is one of the most important parts to placing your baby for adoption. We know how much you love your baby, and therefore it is so important to find a family that you feel is a perfect fit.

All the families at the adoption agency have completed a home study and background checks to ensure they are stable, fully prepared to adopt, and will provide a safe home full of love for an adopted child.

You will be given the opportunity to go through all of our families and get to know them through emails, texts, phone calls and in person visits. Once you have chosen the family that you would like to place with, Adoption Minnesota helps you finish planning the rest of the adoption plan. With a private adoption agency like Adoption Minnesota, you are the one in charge when creating the adoption plan and giving up your baby.

  1. Give Birth/Delivery

The hospital experience will be planned out with your Adoption Minnesota counselor, who will coordinate this plan with your hospital of choice. Much like your adoption plan,  you have full control over your hospital stay. You get to decide if and how much time you want to spend with your baby and if and when you want the adoptive family to come to the hospital.

  1. Complete the Legal Steps to finalize the adoption plan.

Once your baby is born your Adoption Minnesota counselor and your adoption attorney will make sure you understand your rights and the legal aspects of finalizing the adoption.  They will make sure you’re comfortable with your decision before proceeding with the paperwork that gives your consent to the adoption, allowing the adoption to become final.

  1. After placement of your baby for adoption and ongoing contact:

Placing your child for adoption is just the beginning. Rather than “goodbye,” birth parents have the option to have openness and ongoing communication and visits after placement with their child and the adoptive family.

It is up to you to decide what kind of relationship you want to have with your child and the adoptive family after the adoption. Just as you get to decide how to “give up” your baby for adoption, you get to decide how you want your open adoption to look after placement.

  • Typically, women receive updates and photos of their child for 18 years.
  • Many also stay in contact with the adoptive family through emails, phone calls, text messages and social media updates.
  • Some plan in person visits once per year or more.

Adoption Minnesota hopes that this information was helpful. If you have any questions or want to learn more. Please reach out to us at www.adoptionmn.com or call at 612-333-0593!

Pregnant Considering Adoption

unplanned pregnancy support minnesota

If you are pregnant considering adoption you may want to ask yourself, do I have:

  • A dedicated social worker who will meet you in person in a location of your choice
  • A worker located in MN
  • A worker who will help you find a doctor in your area if you need
  • An adoption worker who will come to the hospital and help you through that difficult time
  • An adoption worker who is only working and supporting you through this process and not the adoptive parents as well
  • post adoption support
  • support groups that you can attend

If not, you may be working with a facilitator and not an adoption agency. Adoption Minnesota is a local agency in Minnesota that makes sure that their clients have someone to meet with in person, who is willing to come to them anywhere in MN. We walk birth parents through the process step by step and help them to create an adoption plan that fits their needs and wants for their child.

Adoption Minnesota’s Birth Mother Video

 

Click the photo to watch Adoption Minnesota‘s new video for birth mothers. If you or someone you know wants more information on adoption services and what the adoption process looks like have them reach out to Adoption Minnesota at 612-333-0593, or by text at 612-616-4564. We are here to help birth parents through this incredibly hard time. We provide counseling, help putting baby up for adoption and creating a plan for openness. We provide support and counseling after the placement and can refer them to other support groups too!

Pregnant and considering adoption?

Are Pregnant and Considering Adoption?

Adoption Minnesota is a licensed adoption agency in Minnesota. We work with women who are pregnant and considering adoption. We encourage you to make all the key decisions about your pregnancy, your baby, and your adoption. We are there to help you during the pregnancy, birth and for as long after the adoption as you want.

Adoption Minnesota wants you to know that if you are pregnant and considering adoption, we are here to support you through this process. If you would like to learn more about how we can help either fill out an info form or call us at 612-333-0593.

Birth Mother’s Day!

Birth Mother’s Day

 May 8, 2021!

At Adoption Minnesota we cherish and honor those of you who have bravely made an adoption plan for your child. Giving your baby up for adoption can be one of the hardest decisions you may ever have to make, and we want to make sure you know that you are thought of, admired, and respected. Your love, strength and courage for your child is one that they will always know of. We hope that you are celebrated and shown the love and compassion that you deserve. Happy Birth Mother’s Day!

If you are thinking about giving your baby up/placing your child for adoption and want more information, please reach out to Adoption Minnesota at info@adoptionmn.com or at 612-333-0593. We are here to help you through this very difficult time.

Who can adopt my baby?

Who can adopt my baby?

Many women who are looking into placing their baby for adoption may be thinking, “How will I find the right family to adopt my baby, or who is out there to adopt my baby.” Adoption Minnesota is here to help! We have families who, will adopt your baby, who have been home study approved and are ready to adopt. Find our families at https://adoptionmn.com/waiting-families/

Adoption Minnesota is here to help you through the process of finding the right family for you and your baby. We can help facilitate meeting families that you are interested in, and create an adoption plan, including what kind of openness you want with your child and the family after the adoption is final.

Just know that if you are thinking, “Who can adopt my baby” Adoption Minnesota is here to help. If you want to talk about the process or have questions please reach out either through our website www.adoptionmn.com or call us at 612-333-0593.

Important Factors to Remember When Giving up Your Baby for Adoption

Important Factors to Remember When Giving up Your Baby for Adoption

If you are thinking about giving your baby for adoption or placing your newborn or child for adoption there are many things you should know about your rights and the process before you start working with an adoption agency. Here at Adoption Minnesota we think that it is important to work with a private adoption agency who helps you through the adoption process in a caring, compassionate and non-pressuring manner. An adoption agency should be there to help you through the process, make sure your legal rights are followed and support you with each step of your journey. Here are some important rights to remember that you have during the process of giving up your baby for adoption.

  1. You have the right to receive FREE, in person adoption counseling.
    • Counseling for adoption should always be free. At Adoption Minnesota it is also free from pressure, and any influence. This should be your plan and an adoption agency should not push their agenda on you. If you chose to place your child for adoption, you also have the right to receive support after the adoption takes place for as long as you need it.
  1. You have the option to work with a licensed, nonprofit private adoption agency.
    • If you are thinking about placing or giving up your baby for adoption, keep in mind that not all adoption agencies are the same. Some unlicensed organizations and individuals earn a great deal of money by encouraging and pressuring women to place for adoption. Always ask the adoption agency you are working with if they are licensed for adoption in the state you live in.
  1. You can receive financial assistance if you choose to make an adoption.
    • If you decide that adoption is right for you and your child, you have the right to receive help financially. Adoptive parents can help with basic living and medical expenses during your pregnancy, and for up to 6 weeks after you deliver.
  1. You as the birth parent should be allowed to decide how you want your adoption to go.
    • If you decide that giving up your baby or placing for adoption is right for you, then you should be in control of how the adoption will proceed. You can decide who the adoptive family will be, how the hospital time will go, and also what you want for openness or contact after placement. An adoption agency should not pressure you to do it “their way.” At Adoption Minnesota every adoption is different, and unique. We feel that it is very important to support and help birth parents create an adoption plan that fits them and their child.
  1. You have the right to your own attorney and to have your legal rights represented at no cost to you.
    • If you are planning on placing for adoption or giving up your baby it is important that you have your own attorney. If you are not working with an adoption agency, we urge you not to waive your right to an attorney. Having your own attorney allows you to have the legal support you need, and also have the emotional knowing that you have someone on your side making sure your rights are respected and followed.
  1. You have the option to have a legally binding agreement about what kind of future contact you want with your baby.
    • A legal binding Contact Agreement lays out the details of what kind of contact birth parents, adoptive parents and your child will have after placement. Each Contact Agreement is different and not every state has them, but your agency should tell you about them and offer to get you in touch with an attorney to draft one if you would like.
  1. No matter what you should be respected, regardless of your decision.
    • Whether you decide to give up your baby for adoption or not, you should not be pressured or made to feel guilty by the agency or people that you are working with. Making a choice about adoption is a very difficult decision and you should be respected no matter what you decide. Adoption Minnesota supports women in whatever decision they make and are here to support them in the process.

If you have any questions or want to talk more about the adoption process please reach out to us at info@adoptionmn.com or www.adoptionmn.com.

Social Media and Adoption

Social Media and Adoption

Our society uses social media to keep in touch with family, friends and many others. Social media has changed the way we communicate both in our personal and even work lives. Adoption is no different and birth parents and adoptive families are no exception.

In the adoption world social media can help make connections between adoptive parents and birth parents. It can help to keep an open adoption going with easy communication. Online support groups offer communities for adoptive and birth parents, that are easily accessible for when they need them.

Before agreeing to be friends through social media Adoption Minnesota encourages adoptive parents need to think about how they will feel if they were to see their child’s birth parents or family posting about their struggles and the coping that go along with placing a child for adoption. They also encourage birth parents, to think about how they will feel reading about the feelings adoptive parents might post about the adoption process, fear, stress, nervousness, happiness etc. When using social media, it’s important to remember that the adoption process is not only your story, but your child’s story, and the way you tell that story could impact everyone involved in the adoption. The following are some tips for when you are considering using social media on your adoption journey.

For Birth Parents and Adoptive Parents:

  • Assume that anything you say or post on social media will stay there forever. Before posting sensitive information about your adoption plans and your child, consider the possibility that the information you share now could one day be seen by your child.
  • It is a good idea to work on a post adoption social media plan. Adoption Minnesota along with many other agencies help adoptive parents and birth parents create one so that everyone is on the same page about what will be posted. Having a plan in place will allow birth parents and adoptive families to establish and agree on boundaries regarding discussions of their child and the adoption on social media.
  • If you are not currently a social media user or not a frequent user, it is very important to become familiar with sites before using them. Many sites have features that you should understand about public or private information and how you add information that is private verses public. Even after you become familiar with the privacy settings on any given site it is also important to still be aware that these sites often change the settings options. If you plan to share information about your adoption process on social media, adjust your privacy settings to limit the people who can access that information.
  • When sharing adoption information with your social media networks, remember that friends can share or respond to your posts, opening your information to a wider audience beyond your intended group of friends and followers. Include this consideration in your pre- and post-adoption social media plan.
  • Adoption Minnesota suggests that parties do not share identifying information about the birth or adoptive family or the child.
  • When sharing images of children, consider private photo-sharing websites that require a password to view posted photo galleries.
  • If you have an open adoption, consider setting up a separate, private website or private Facebook page to share pictures, information and milestones between the birth and adoptive families. This will allow you to share adoption information with a select group of individuals without including the day-to-day information you might share on your public social media sites.
  • Have clear boundaries from the beginning about who you will accept friend and follower requests from, including extended birth and adoptive family members.
  • Avoid angry or emotionally charged communication about other members of the adoption process. Again, remember that anything you do or say on social media could potentially be seen by your child one day, and these types of negative posts could be upsetting to your child.
  • Monitor and censor what friends post on your social media pages. If you shared adoption information with a friend or family member outside of social media, they may post questions or information to your social media pages that publicly reveals this information.
  • When posting to online adoption support groups or discussion forums, be careful to guard the privacy and identity of the members of your adoption. Consider changing names or using commonly used acronyms, such as “BP” for birth parent.

For Birth Parents:

  • Talk with your family, friends and the birthfather about your post adoption social media plan. Make sure everyone understands your wishes regarding the information that is shared on social media.
  • If you receive a friend request from a child, speak to your Adoption Minnesota counselor or an adoption specialist before responding. Social media is often not the best format to make these types of connections, and you may consider redirecting the request to more traditional formats, such as personal letters or emails.
  • Do not criticize the adoptive parents on social media, including expressing frustration with their parenting decisions.

For Adoptive Parents:

  • Do not post pre-placement adoption information, such as ultrasound photos, without an agreement from the birth parents.
  • If you are connected to your child’s birth family on social media, avoid posting complaints about your child. Simple expressions of routine frustrations over late-night diaper changes or a messy bedroom can be misinterpreted by birth parents and lead to hurt feelings.
  • If you have an open or semi-open adoption with your child’s birth parents, share big news and milestones regarding your child with them directly via letter, email or phone call before posting it online for the rest of your social network to see.
  • Never criticize members of the birth family on social media, including those who seem to be unsupportive of the birth mother’s adoption decision.
  • As your child grows up and begins to use social media, consider their privacy settings and their access to information about their birth family. Prepare your child for the pros and cons of developing a social media relationship with his or her birth family.

Social Media can be a great way to get to know each other and stay connect, but it can also lead to hurt feelings and misconceptions if not used right. The important thing to think about when using social media for adoption purposes is how it will affect everyone involved. As long as both sides are on the same page and have discussed their plan, Adoption Minnesota feels that social media can be a very helpful adoption tool.

 

You Are Not “Giving Up” by Choosing Adoption

You Are Not “Giving Up” by Choosing Adoption

You Are Choosing the Best Life Possible for Your Baby

Giving a baby up for adoption isn’t giving up! In the very least it is giving life. Birth mothers have thought long and hard about their adoption plans, they sometimes spend months planning how the adoption will go. They are just trying to choose the best life for their child. It takes an incredible amount of courage to say that you might not be what is best and that you want more for your child then what you can give them right now.

The term “giving up” can be read on websites, heard on TV shows and even be said in causal conversation among friends, but that doesn’t make the term correct. In reality women who create an adoption plan do not “give up” anything, if anything they give.

Birth mothers are making an adoption plan to give their children everything they want for them and may not be able to give them themselves. They give them adoptive families, love, stability, opportunities and much more. Nothing about an adoption plan is giving up.

Adoption has also changed so much through the years. Women no longer are forced to give up their children if they are young, single parents like they were in the past. With an open adoption birth mothers get to choose a family, decide how their adoption will go and also have visits and updates through out the years. They are not giving up, but getting to be in their children’s lives.

Adoption Minnesota wants women to know that it is not giving up in any way. It is making a plan for a child that hopefully is best for them and also for you. If you have any questions about the process or adoption please contact us at 612-333-0593 or info@adoptionmn.com.

How to Give Your Baby up for Adoption

How to Give Your Baby up for Adoption

Finding out that you are having an unplanned pregnancy can be a really scary time. Many birth parents feel overwhelmed about what to do and find it hard to get accurate information about their options. Adoption Minnesota, one of the biggest adoption agencies in Minnesota wants to help teach you about the adoption process and how to give your baby up for adoption.

The first step in giving your baby up for adoption is to call an adoption counselor. Adoption Minnesota counselors are available day and night to talk with you and support you through this process of placing your newborn or child for adoption.

The next step is finding an adoptive family. Adoption Minnesota has many families for you to choose from. After you decide which family you are interested in, you can proceed however you’d like. You may call, email or meet with adoptive parents. You can communicate your plan directly through your adoption counselor also. browse waiting families»

After you have decided on which family you would like to give your baby to we sit down and create an adoption plan. Adoption Minnesota can help you create an adoption plan that fits your needs. Your counselor will assist you in planning your hospital stay. You can decide on spending time with your baby and/or the adoptive parents, if that is what you desire. You can also create a plan for future contact with your child and the adoptive parents that can include photos, updates and possible visits. Giving your baby up for adoption is a really hard process and many birth parents want to have some openness after the placement, so that they know how their child is doing.

After you have placed or given your baby up for adoption we are here to support you and help you grieve. Your counselor will be available to talk and meet with you after the adoption placement for as long as you need support. We can help you find support groups and other birth parents to speak with who have gone through the adoption process.

If you have additional questions Adoption Minnesota is here to help. You can reach us at info@adoptionmn.com or through our website www.adoptionmn.com